PUBLIC FORUM – Students of Newport Public Schools Speak Out

  • DATE: Tuesday, May 1st
  • TIME: 6-7:30 PM
  • LOCATION: Claiborne Pell Elementary School | 35 Dexter Street, Newport, RI.

A Public Forum Presented by the One Newport NPS Strategic Plan Subcommittee And Alliance for Livable Newport (ALN)

Listen to our Thompson and Rogers School students talk about their future aspirations and
the roles education and the community play in making life choices. Here’s an opportunity to
understand the perspectives of Newport’s young people as they navigate technology, social
media, classroom traditions, extracurricular activities, family pressures and a rapid change in
the labor market.


You have heard from the Newport City Council and the School Committee, and about the
Newport Public Schools’ Strategic Plan. Now is the time to hear from our most important
educational constituents.

Panelists:
Students from Rogers High School and Thompson Middle School

If you could ask them a question what would it be? Now is your opportunity.

Questions may be submitted via email before the forum or in writing the night of the event.
info@newportalliance.org/

You do not have to be present at the forum to have your question chosen.

The One Newport Subcommittee is a group of volunteers who are committed to helping improve the Newport Public Schools.

They believe that a superior educational system is critical not only for the children of Newport but also for the future of the City.

For over 10 years, the Alliance for a Livable Newport (ALN) has promoted and enhanced the quality
of life in its city by providing an unbiased resource for information on issues facing our community.

CONTACT For Immediate Release: April 13, 2018
Isabel Griffith, Co-President
Alliance for a Livable Newport
Igriffith38@verizon.net
401.849-6444

ALN Public Forum – Newport Utilities Department – Monday, February 27, at 5:30 Edward King House

DATE: Monday, February 27
TIME: 5:30pm 
LOCATION: Edward King House, Ballroom – 35 King St, Newport, RI 02840

The Alliance for a Livable Newport (ALN) will be holding its first Public Forum of the year featuring Julia Forgue, Director of the Newport Utilities Department, and her staff will talk about their department’s responsibilities and operations.

The Department of Utilities is comprised of two divisions, the Water Division and the Water Pollution Control Divisionhttp://www.cityofnewport.com/departments/utilities

The Water Division operates and manages the source water reservoirs, treatment plants, storage tanks and distribution system. The City’s water distribution system also services the Town of Middletown and a small portion of the Town of Portsmouth. We also sell water wholesale to the Portsmouth Water and Fire District and Naval Station Newport.

The Water Division is responsible for providing drinking water that meets standards established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Rhode Island Department of Health (RIDOH). The Water Division is licensed by the RIDOH as a Public Water Supplier, License # 1592010. The Water Division is also required to report to the Rhode Island Water Resources Board.

The Water Pollution Control Division is responsible for providing wastewater treatment for the residents of Newport. In addition we provide wastewater treatment on a wholesale basis to the Town of Middletown and Naval Station Newport. The Water Pollution Control Division also manages the storm drainage system within the City.

Public Workshop: Protecting Newport Historic and Cultural Assets from Flooding Caused by Sea Level Rise

The public is invited to participate in a community workshop on flood protection for historic and culturally valuable properties on Newport’s coast. The workshop is scheduled for THURSDAY, JULY 14, 2016, 3-7 P.M., at Emmanuel Church, 42 Dearborn St., Newport, RI 02840.

NOTE: The public is welcome for the whole event; a general overview of the project will be given at 5 p.m. to ensure attendees arriving later in the day have ample opportunity to gain information. RSVP if attending by July 11 to ensure adequate refreshments.

The workshop follows the April 2016 Keeping History Above Water Conference in Newport, which explored historic preservation efforts regarding flooding from sea level rise a key impact of climate change. Newport hosts a broad array of historical and cultural assets, including registered historic buildings, and rising water and increased storminess is expected to threaten these over time. The University of Rhode Island (URI) Coastal Resources Center (CRC) and Rhode Island Sea Grant are facilitating the meeting for several community groups interested in continuing the conference dialogue. The event is also possible due to generous support from the Prince Charitable Trusts.

Science indicates that Rhode Island is more likely than many other coastal states to experience flooding over time from sea level rise, said Dawn Kotowicz, a coastal manager for CRC and extension agent for Rhode Island Sea Grant. Coastal development, including the historic properties and cultural assets that Newport values, is at risk, so collaborating on practical solutions is critical.

CRC and Rhode Island Sea Grant, at the URI Graduate School of Oceanography, provide Rhode Island and beyond with a variety of community-based coastal management and outreach services and programs.

For more information about the workshop, please contact Dawn Kotowicz at (401) 874-6152. Please RSVP. For media inquiries, contact Sue Kennedy at (401) 874-6107 orskennedy@crc.uri.edu.

http://www.crc.uri.edu/2016/07/public-workshop-protecting-newport-historic-and-cultural-assets-from-flooding-caused-by-sea-level-rise/

 

New Office of the President – ALN Reorganizes Executive Responsibilities

TO: ALN SUBSCRIBERS

FROM: ALN OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT

RE: ALN OFFICERS

DATE: JULY 16, 2013

The Executive Officers of ALN have reorganized executive responsibilities for the organization into a new Office of the President.

As was noted in the memorandum sent to you last month announcing our membership drive, the past few years have seen a decline in the number of individuals willing to volunteer significant time and effort to sustain the organization. That has resulted in more and more demands on the time of ALN’s president, to the point where that position has become unreasonably burdensome. Our solution to this problem is the creation of an Office of the President, which combines the responsibilities of the president, vice president and secretary, sharing them equally among three individuals.

For legal and financial reporting reasons, Ron Becker has been designated president, John Hirschboeck has the title of vice president and Isabel Griffith has the title of secretary. However, actual executive responsibilities will be distributed equally among them. Ron Becker will continue as treasurer.

For the future, ALN will sponsor a forum only if at least two volunteers step forward to take responsibility for the planning and implementation of the forum. The Office of the President will provide support, but not assume the major workload as has been the case for most or our recent forums. We have had several excellent suggestions about topics for future forums and we encourage you to submit your ideas; however, we also encourage you to volunteer to help turn your idea into an actual forum. Suggestions and volunteering should be directed by email to info@newportalliance.org/ or by regular mail to ALN, P.O. Box 2636, Newport, RI 02840.

We also encourage those of you who have not yet responded to the Membership Drive to do so by donating $25 or more via PayPal through ALN’s website, www.newportalliance.org/, or by mailing a check to the address noted in the preceding paragraph.

ALN Board of Directors asks the question; “Is it do or die”?

ALN Logo Banner

TO: ALN Subscribers

FROM: ALN Board of Directors

RE: ALN’s Future

DATE: June 26, 2013

Every year Alliance For A Livable Newport (ALN) has had a membership drive each March in advance of the April annual meeting. This year both the membership drive and the annual meeting were postponed while the ALN Board did some soul searching about ALN’s future. The Board is concerned about two factors, both having a significant negative effect on the organization and bringing into question whether the organization can continue to operate and, if so, on what level.

(1) Over the past two years ALN has lost major financial contributors. Members’ dues and donations from neighborhood associations accounted for less than 30% of its operating budget. The balance came from “deep pockets” supporters. For various reasons, those supporters have ceased to contribute at the level they have in past years (some have ceased contributing altogether).

 (2)At the same time, members who had contributed their time and efforts to do the work necessary to plan, organize and facilitate ALN’s activities drifted away, again for a variety of reasons. They left a very small core group of workers who are suffering from burn out trying to do all the work that was shared by many more in the past.

At a meeting of the Board of Directors on June 18, there was a solid consensus that ALN had come too far, accomplished too much, and plays too important a role in Newport to just shut down. Some extreme economies are being adopted; foremost being the elimination of our part-time administrative assistant who handled the organization’s day-to-day operational needs including arrangements for forums.

A member of the Board has taken on the website maintenance role that the administrative assistant had performed. Secretarial responsibilities are being absorbed on a rotating basis by other Board members. In the future, facilitation of forums will be the responsibility of each forum’s “champions.” From now on there must be at least two persons volunteering to do the work to make a forum happen. With these changes the Board feels that the organization can survive on the financial support provided by members’ dues, neighborhood association donations and forum sponsorship donations.

One key factor driving our determination to continue is the firm backing of the neighborhood associations. Earlier this year ALN sponsored a meeting of the executive officers of Newport’s neighborhood associations, where they exchanged information about their organizations and the issues that are of greatest concern. There will be a follow up meeting in July and there was agreement that the meetings should continue on a regular basis in the future. The neighborhood associations see ALN as the best, if not only, means of elevating their neighborhood concerns to a citywide focus and cause of action. That is the role that was the basis of ALN’s founding close to ten years ago and is the role we are determined to sustain.

All that being said, we are turning to you, our members and subscribers, to validate the Board’s decision by renewing your ALN membership and paying dues for 2013. Your dues of $25 or more will now represent close to 50% of ALN’s budget and will be vital to our remaining operational.

Dues can be paid online via ALN’s website at www.newportalliance.org/, or by mailing a check to ALN, P.O. Box 2636, Newport, RI 02840.

We greatly appreciate your support.
Gray
Questions, comments, concerns? Contact us at info@newportalliance.org/ today!
donate Credit Cards

Newport This Week writes: “Online Survey Solicits Residents’ Opinions”

nn-logo-new3-01

http://www.newport-now.com/articles/online-survey-solicits-residents%27-opinions/

December 28, 2012  – By Meg O’Neil

The community-interest group Alliance for a Livable Newport has announced that it will conduct monthly email and Facebook surveys to get feedback on what’s going on in the city, including several major projects that will affect residents of Aquidneck Island. Anyone, from any town, who accesses the group’s website or Facebook page online can respond to the surveys.

Approximately 90 people responded to the first survey, which contained three questions – about the proposed tolls on the Sakonnet River Bridge, the Broadway improvement construction slated for 2013, and the wind turbine ordinance recently passed by the Newport City Council. Only the toll question requested a “Yes” or “No”  response; the other two questions solicited comments only.

One of the biggest local issues of 2012 has been the prospect of Sakonnet River Bridge tolls. After the state Department of Transportation turned over responsibility for the Sakonnet River and Jamestown bridges to the state Turnpike & Bridge Authority, the Authority announced that in order to maintain Aquidneck Island’s four-bridge system (including the Pell and Mount Hope Bridges), it would have to either raise the toll on the Pell Bridge to $5 or add new tolls on the Sakonnet River Bridge.

Public outcry from residents of Portsmouth, Tiverton, Bristol, and Little Compton led to a 20,000-signature petition against the tolls, and several public forums were held where many residents and business owners spoke out against the tolls.

According to the results of the Alliance survey, 39.5 percent of those who responded were in favor of the tolls, while 54.1 percent were opposed, and 6.2 percent had no response.

Another survey question pertained to plans for the reconstruction and redesign of lower Broadway. Recently presented at a Newport City Council workshop, the project would be done during the summer of 2013. The survey question read: “Will it be worth the turmoil in a major commercial district over the busy 2013 summer tourist season to keep within the project timetable? If the project is suspended over the summer months to permit greater access to businesses and ease traffic congestion, the project costs increase and therefore would not be completed until 2014.”

Read More at Newport Now!

Read moreNewport This Week writes: “Online Survey Solicits Residents’ Opinions”

Survey Responses Question #3 Wind Turbine Ordinance

Alliance for a Livable Newport December 2012  Survey Results
Survey Name: 3 Questions – 3 Minutes
Dec 26, 2012 8:20:14 PM

 PLEASE COMMENT BELOW

3.  Newport City Council passed a “Wind Turbine Ordinance” at their last meeting in 2012. The ordinance is “conservative” and considers most of Newport unsuitable for Wind Turbines.

If your property qualified for a small residential turbine, would you want one? How about if a turbine was on your neighbors property? 

Should small residential turbines be BANNED from Newport’s Historic District properties?   – Responses

Answer
1 Yes,  OK,  No
2 I don’t know enough to have a valid opinion. My gut reaction is to say banning something that can be such a help to the residents of Newport is silly.
3 NO!
4 I actually think wind turbines are beautiful, but also feel that the landscape and views of our coast and community are more beautiful, that we should make every effort to preserve this view. Once it’s lost, it’s lost for good. Small turbines, like those pictured above would be OK, but anything mounted on a pole above the landscape would not work!
5 No
6 yes – wind turbines should be banned from historic districts.
7 No turbines in close quarters.  Unsuitable when houses are close to eachother.  Everything else is banned in historic districts, so why would this be different?
8 For a city located on the coast and most at risk for the effects of global warming, you would think we might have some forward thinking representatives. I am very interested in utilizing wind turbines at my home in a historic district. What use is an ordinance that bans the use of turbines on a large percentage of the city’s residential structures.
9 Undecided
10 This is a huge question. We certainly don’t mind satellite-TV antennas all over the houses. I don’t think many of us know what a wind turbine looks like apart from the large ones. I certainly would like one whipping around in my neighbor’s yard. Certainly not if it’s only for the purpose of allowing the occupants to continue to use excesses of elec
11 yes
12 yes, wouldn’t mind if they were there… supports RI’s ecological conservative mindset
13 As with any project in Historic Districts it must be  taken on a case-by-case basis. Solar panels where they are nearly invisible or can be incorporated into landscaping have been allowed in HD’s and the same could be true of wind turbines. The major difference, of course, is the moving parts. Much like HVAC units the decibels must be considered.
14 Yes, they should be banned. They look terrible. We live in the Historic District and can’t have them and we can’t have the newer windows so pay lots for heating that other people don’t have to pay. We should all have the same options.
15 Residents should me able to have small quiet winde machines that do not impact neighbors quality of life anywhere in the city
16 Small residential turbines should be allowed in all areas of the city, with noise limitations. No, I would not build one.
17 yes
18 Absolutely!  One of Newport’s main attribute is it’s historic architecture.  Wind turbines don’t belong here.
19 NO!They should’nt be banned.As long as they are suitable for that property size.Again this city has to many uptight citizens complaining about everything!The home owner is doing something good for himself and the enviroment.Take some strain of the grid.The Historic District is a joke to.250 year old rundown pieces of crap.Might makeit look better
20 Wind turbines are the “green” way to go. Bring them on!!!
21 At present yes,  Does anyone remember when most homes had TV antennas on their roof.  Will technology become more attractive.  I believe so.
22 I am in favor of allowing SMALL Residential wind turbines. Noise needs to be kept to a minimum for any turbines in residential districts. Not sure how I feel about turbines in the Historic Districts. BUT I am in favor of allowing SOLAR Panels in historic districts.
23 Of course they should be banned in the Historic District. I would not be happy if a neighbor installed a turbine. My house is just a dozen feet from my neighbor’s house.
24 Yes.  The city is too small to have such wind turbines in the middle of a historic district.  There are better places for wind turbines that do not ruin the aesthetics or have noise impacts on reidences.
25 Yes
26 I would welcome small turbines and more solar panels.
27 Of course I’d want one, and on my 211-yeaqr old house as well; I believe it would still look appealing with a propellar on the roof. More importantly, I want cleaner air for my grandchildren, which the continued use of fossil fuels will make impossible.
28 No; there is a very limited market for small capacity turbines.  My lot, at 10K SF and outside the district qualifies but with large trees and the height limit it makes no economic sense, and would have a big impact on neighbors.  The criteria should be based on land area (10K SF is too small) not historic district, these are temporary structures
29 I would support wind turbines as shown in your picturel in the historic district if not viewed from the street or impacting the actual historic structures.  Structures less than 100 years old should be permited to have them, even if the house is in a HD.
30 I have no problems with wind turbines. They’re less unsightly than satellite dishes, and less noisy than generators. I don’t think the commission ever gave the issue serious consideration, and they were set up with the sole intention of banning them from the get go.
31 More flexibility is needed in determining appropriateness for differing historic districts. Nothing in the historic zoning ordinance rules out turbines out of hand. An aesthetic leap has been made between “historic” and “appropriate.” The south end has the largest lots and the best wind, and the strongest NIMBY pressure, which should’t be a factor.
32 Yes we would want one and we would have no problem with our neighbors having one. I don’t see any reason to prevent people in historic districts from haing them either. This is not a novelty or aesthetic device. The future of the country and the planet depend on the rapid implementation of alternative energy sources.
33 I would wnat one on my house and I don’t mind if my neighbor has one.  The HD should be a case by case basis.
34 no. People have satelite dishes “for pleasure”.  These turbines are  essential.
35 Yes.
36 YES
37 I might want one for my own property but only if it were very effective and visually unobtrusive. I do NOT think turbines should be allowed in the historic districts.
38 yes
39 Don’t live in Newport.
40 Ban unless installation is out of sight.  Historic properties are key to the economy of Newport (tourist) and appearance must be preserved.
41 If I had a property on ocean drive I’d want to install a residential turbine. The original recommendation by the Planning Board was to allow such turbines in the Historic District for lots of min 4 acres. Within such reasonable limits property owners should be free to install turbines to save money and become more independent if that’s their choice
42 Yes, turbines should be banned from the NHD but I would permit small residential turbines in other areas.
43 NO
44 yes they should be banned
45 no
46 Is or should ‘turbines’ Be Banned??? I can’t even imagine why?
47 If small turbines are banned so should direct TV dishes.  If it is attached to the roof and not up on a huge pole I’m not sure what the problem is. People have had huge antennas on their houses for years and no one cared.
48 All depends on the size and style. Small turbines  should be allowed!  Noise is an issue, but the vertical ones are fairly quiet, I have heard.
49 NO, Newport County is perfect for wind turbines.  The council got this terribly wrong.
50 no
51 yes
52 ss
53 Yes banned from historic districts All depends on noise otherwise.
54 yes
55 No turbine on our property OK for my neighbor to install a small turbine Yes, should be banned from Historic District
56 Yes — not in keeping with our history
57 Yes.  There are other energy saving steps that can be taken that preserve the historic elements – such as storm windows.  The historic district represents one of the most (if not the most) collection of antique homes in the country.  I think Newport can preserve the historic districts and optimize all conservation measures possible.
58 yes to ban on turbines throughout city
59 It would depend on the size of the turbine and the noise it generated and if there were additional costs to using more traditional sources of energy for the rest of us.
60 Absolutely!
61 My neighbor DOES have small turbines on his roof- feel free to come hear them on any windy night. They are unsightly and noisy and for what? Our electric bills are  modest- so clearly he is doing this to get rebates. Does the city tax that income?  I don’;t think so. Solar panels could do the same thing without the noise.
62 I think small wind turbines are not only desirable but very much in the tradition of Newport. For goodness sake, we are the sailing capital of the northeast because we have wind!! Yes, turbines should not disturb neighbors with noise, vibration or flicker but they are integral to energy independence. I for one as a Newport resident want one.
63 no you should be able to make your own house/buisness sustainable limits on size of course
64 Tricky, because these turbines create noise and visual pollution.
65 Rather than banning ALL wind turbines from historic districts we can evaluate evolving technology which trends to smaller and quieter and could eventually be appropriate.  Banning seems both excessive and shortsighted and as building permits are required for instillation there is a monitoring  mechanism already in place.
66 Yes
67 i do not think scattered turbines, of whatever size and in whatever location are appropriate.  swathes/drifts of turbines, on land and water should be constructed, providing power for the entire island. scattered shot pollutes the eye and looks hit or miss.  an organized plan with sufficient power and visual cohesion would be far better.
68 I would not personally want one for my property and would be concerned of noise levels from neighbors’ turbines (we have open windows in the summer, no AC)
69 Small wind turbines don’t crank out that much electricity and they can be noisy. Residential wind turbines are a noise factor. And they are not very attractive. How about an incentive for solar panels? Satellite dishes and solar panels don’t make noise – meanwhile Cox and National Grid are getting higher prices with poorer service.
70 I don’t think they should be in the historic district
71 Nothing I read distinguished between types of turbines. If “small residential turbine” means a rooftop turbine where a large ground-planted turbine is unsuitable, then I beleive the city counncil should allow them. I would welcome an appropriate turbine on my neighbors’ properties. Not sure about historic districts. Need to hear more info and think
72 no   solar panels should be allowed also.
73 Yes, banned from historic properties only. If they are silent, and can be placed at least 25 ft. High, they should be allowed in residential neighborhoods. This will also increase the supply of squab for grilling in the summer months.
74 I live in a Historic District condo (Bellevue Sq). I would not mind having solar panels or small (vibration-free)wind turbines on our own or neighboring roofs. Ditto for composting, permeable drives and drain ways, etc. Preservation has to modify to fit the times. Good designers and landscapers can help blend such with traditional character.
75 Small turbines come in many form factors; we’ve been poorly educated by the city on the numerous alternatives. Hence their action was drastic, premature, and likely targeted the one home in Fifth Ward.
76 Yes
77 I don’t want a wind turbine on my property or my neighbor’s and would prefer that wind turbines be banned from the historic districts.
78 Yes!  I would not want to look at them, although if they could be concealed I might not object. Then again, I might get used to them after a while.
79 ~If my property qualified, I would consider a turbine.  ~I would not object to a turbine on neighboring property.  ~I would allow turbines in any neighborhood/district that allows structures such as satellite dishes, and I would evaluate carefully their benefits on school properties as evidenced in adjacent communities.
80 No!  This is the stupidest, most nearsighted, reactionary and obstructionist idea ever.  We need to be creative about producing clean power locally, and blanket bans are the opposite of creative.  What we need are some simple guidelines such as safe fall zones, protection of specific vistas, etc that allow homeowners to be creative within them.
81 I do NOT think there should be a ban on small residential turbines.  There are potentially more exceptions to the rule than protections to places where turbines are not acceptable.  This ordinance is an easy way out.  These types of renewable energy decisions should be on a case by case basis, not an all or none philosophy.
82 Need more information as to actually how much power would be generated by small turbines and how much the savings to homeowners would be. Depending on size, they could be fine in the historic district
83 Absolutely banned from the Historic District! I would not put one on my house and would not want one on my neighbor’s.  I support preserving the environment, energey conservation,etc., but the thought of having these turbines on rooftops in  Newport is disturbing.
84 If window a/c units are allowed in the Historic District, then small turbines should be.  My lot is too small, but larger lot owners should be allowed to have them.  We need to encourage wind power, but phasing it in while we study their impacts They should be placed so as not to intrude (noise, vibration, flicker) on neighboring properties.
85 No wind mills in town except for beanies worn by proponents of wind power. Why destroy all the efforts by  home owners to follow a theme of colonial Newport and goof it all up with a circus atmosphere?
86 Turbines ought to be banned from the historic district, but I am much in favor of Turbine development outside of this area.
87 Big turbines, serving the public, out on The Drive, away from residences, would be great. Since Newport should be striving for World Heritage designation, I feel that turbines don’t belong in the core Historic city.
88 Yes I would use one. And no wind turbines should not be banned anywhere period. We need to find alternative power sources.
89 Go Geo thermal We did
90 Yes.

Safety is Newport’s Number One Priorty, Mayor Says

The Mayor and City Manager held a press conference on Monday to address safety in Newport.

Harry Winthrop, Mayor and Jane Howington, City Manager

In light of recent assault reports, including a 42-year-old woman attacked on Ruggles Avenueand a group of boys victim of attempted robbery,Newport Mayor Harry Winthrop and City Manager Jane Howington called a second press conference to address the public’s perception of safety in Newport.

The meeting was also attended by Newport City Council members.

“The number one priority in Newport is public safety. We will deploy whatever resources necessary,” Winthrop said.

As for added safety measures due to assault reports and rumors, Howington said that there are officers in the police department that can be moved around to different areas that could be hot spots for random assaults.

“If there is a hot spot and we have leads, we’ll put plain clothes officers out there,” she said.

Howington said the city will also hire a public information consultant using an emergency purchase order to further communication between the city and the community.

Councilor Kathryn Leonard said she would like to see the city be proactive rather than reactionary. “I would like to see unmarked cars. . .and beat police men. I don’t want to wait for another assault.”

Howington added that the city is taking the recent assaults in Newport so seriously because of the growing perception that the community is unsafe. That perception has been perpetuated by social media and blogs, she said.

The community would also benefit from resurrecting the neighborhood watch mentality. “If you see something, say something,” she said.

As for added police efforts, Councilor Justin McLaughlin said the community should trust that the police department are being transparent, up to some point.

“The police department can’t reveal everything,” he said.

The Newport Police Department is currently analyzing crime data to determine what, if any, if any areas in town have patterns of random assaults.

Related Topics: AssaultsNewport Safety, and newport city council

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Steve Heath seeking advisers for “Newport FabLab” at East Bay Met School

(October 21, 2012) A team of educators, industry representatives, after school providers, and public officials are developing a digital fabrication studio (FabLab) in the Florence Gray Center in the north end of Newport. (1 York St Newport, RI 02840 )

Leading this initiative is Steve Heath, Community Learning Specialist, East Bay Met School. Steve has 15 years of program development in urban public, and private schools  and can be reached at (401) 439-0160, sheath@metmail.org, or 1 York Street, Newport, RI 02840

The Newport FabLab promises to serve as a catalyst for educational collaboration and industry participation by addressing disenfranchised and high achieving students of all ages.

Steve says that he is “committed to the ‘FabLab’ project because it addresses educational needs, business aspirations, community development opportunities and innovative ideas.”

What is a FabLab?  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fab_lab    

FabLab
Photo of the Amsterdam FabLab at the Waag Society

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A FabLab (fabrication laboratory) is a small-scale workshop offering (personal) digital fabrication.

A FabLab is generally equipped with an array of flexible computer controlled tools that cover several different length scales and various materials, with the aim to make “almost anything”.[3] This includes technology-enabled products generally perceived as limited to mass production.

While FabLabs have yet to compete with mass production and its associated economies of scale in fabricating widely distributed products, they have already shown the potential to empower individuals to create smart devices for themselves. These devices can be tailored to local or personal needs in ways that are not practical or economical using mass production

Popular FabLab equipment and projects:

Flexible manufacturing equipment within a FabLab can include:

The FabLab would serve youth, artists and businesses, CCRI students, adults interested in developing marketable skills, and Newport County technology companies.

The FabLab can provide Newport County residents with alternative pathways to Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM) careers through mentoring and personalized education, as it links Newport County’s high-tech professionals from Raytheon, over 40 technology-oriented companies, and the Naval Undersea Weapons Center (NUWC) with area students.

Once fully developed, equipped, and staffed, the Newport County FabLab would provide:

· Classes and workshops for students and adults

· Daily after-school programs for middle and high school students

· Facilities to rent for local companies and entrepreneurs

· Classes in collaboration with CCRI, including a specific curriculum designed to enable high school students to get an early start on an Associate’s Degree in Micro Manufacturing or other high-tech subjects.

Our team includes:

We are presently seeking advisors to lend their expertise as we plan for a technologically savvy Newport County.

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Engage Newport with Jimmy Winters and Wayne Clark, Police Department and Fire Department

ENGAGE NEWPORT

NEWPORT, R.I. (October 5, 2012) – Coming soon to a local gathering place near you: Engage Newport, a series of community outreach “open houses”, hosted by the City of Newport, packed with fun, facts and even a bit of food.

The Engage Newport events will be held:

  • Thursday, October 11th at the Quaker Meeting House (corner of Farewell and Marlborough
    Streets) 6pm-8pm
  • Saturday, October 20th at Fort Adams (inside the Fort on the parade field) 9:30am-11:30am
  • Tuesday, October 23rd at the City of Newport Maritime Center, 365 Thames St. (waterside
    entrance of the Armory) 6pm-8pm
  • Saturday, October 27th at the Rotunda at Easton’s Beach 10am – noon

During Engage Newport residents will have an opportunity to discover more about their City’s services and plans for the future and what they do and don’t know about their city all while having fun engaging with the City by the Sea.

There will be activities for all the family to enjoy including fire rescue demonstrations, what services are available at the library, how to reconnect a lost pet with its owner all while taking part in quizzes that will see how much you know about your home town. If you have questions on what to do in an emergency, how to register to vote, what you can recycle or what the rules are for bicycles; then come along and get engaged!

For more information please contact us at (401) 845-5473 or citymanager@cityofnewport.com

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