PROJECTED IMPACT ON RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY TAXES FROM MAJOR CITY OF NEWPORT PROJECTS

October 7, 2020

Between Fiscal Years 2021 (July 1, 2020, to June 30. 2021) and 2025 (July 1, 2024, to June 30, 2025) the residential property tax rate in Newport will be impacted by at least three major projects in addition to the annual increases in the City’s (including the School Department) operating expenses.  The impact of the proposed School Bonds, which will appear on the November ballot, has received much attention in the media; but it is not the only projected impact on property taxes and should not be considered in isolation.  Following is an estimate of those rate increases.  The estimate is based on information provided by the City of Newport Finance Department and the Fiscal Year 2021 Newport Budget available on the City’s website.

Property Taxes Newport Rhode Island

Bonds to Finance New Rogers High School and Pell School Enhancement

The School Bonds will be issued in three tranches with a total of $106,335,000 not fully impacting the City’s budget until Fiscal Year 2025.  At that time the budget will include an entry of $2,866,886 as the City’s share of the bond amortization (net of the Rhode Island anticipated contribution of 52.5% of the cost).  The portion of that entry to be financed by residential property taxes is $1,998,220.  That will add $.38 per $1,000 valuation, or 3.8%, to the residential property tax rate.  The impact on a median-priced residence (excluding estates) of $440,000 will be $167.20.

Other Impacts on Residential Property Tax Rate

The City of Newport Finance Department projects an annual increase in operating expenses (including the School Department) of 2%.  By Fiscal Year 2025 the 2% annual increases compounds to a total increase of more than 6%, with the share borne by the residential property tax rate equaling 4.27%.

In the same time frame, Newport will be faced with the cost of moving its Halsey Street Facilities to make room for the Pell Bridge Off-Ramp Realignment.  That is estimated to cost $25,000,000 and the impact on residential property taxes will be a 1.92% increase in residential property taxes.

Also, the City will be faced with the need to replace or repair the Van Zandt Bridge at an estimated cost of $10,000,000.  The impact on residential property taxes will be a 0.77% increase.

The sum of these three impacts will be a residential property tax increase of 6.96%.

Total impacts on Residential Property Taxes

The increases in the residential property tax rates of the School Bonds and the other increases noted above total 10.76%.  This will increase the residential property tax rate per $1,000 valuation by $1.11.  The impact on a median-priced residence in Newport (excluding estates) valued at $440,000 will be an increase of $488.40 per year.  Residential property owners can use the $1.11 per $1,000 valuation figure to determine the projected tax increase on their own residence.

Newport This Week Presents “Newport Council At Large Candidates” Forum Video via Zoom

September 24, 2020  | Newport This Week | Public Forum Video on Zoom

Seven candidates for the Newport City Council At Large participate in a forum for the 2020 General Election.

Seven candidates for four seats: Jamie Bova, Lynn Underwood Ceglie, Elizabeth “Beth” Cullen, Elizabeth Fuerte, Kevin Michaud, Jeanne-Marie Napolitano, Susan Taylor

Moderator – Carmella Geer, Timer – League of Women Voters, Host – Newport This Week

Get to Know the Candidates

Newport This Week  | on August 27, 2020

To the Editor:

As it has since 2008, The Alliance for a Livable Newport is serving to provide Newport voters comprehensive information about the upcoming elections.

The Alliance for a Livable Newport
The Alliance for a Livable Newport

This year is no different – only more challenging, given that there are 19 candidates for the Newport City Council and 10 candidates for the Newport School Committee, undoubtedly reflective of the extraordinary issues now facing our city and schools. ALN applauds incumbents running for reelection and the many new candidates who’ve taken the time and energy to throw their hats into the ring in a desire and commitment to serve our city.

To assist Newport voters, the Alliance for a Livable Newport asked challenging questions of the 12 At Large candidates and three 3rd Ward candidates vying for the Newport City Council Primary election. (The four candidates competing for the 1st and 2nd Ward seats in the General Election on November 3 have been asked the same questions.)

ALN is gratified that all 19 City Council candidates took the time to craft their responses which can now be found at NewportAlliance.org.

In addition to ALN’s written questions and answers, ALN has joined a Newport This Week collaborative along with the Greater Newport Chamber of Commerce, League of Women Voters of Newport County, Newport Buzz and WADK to host on-air “Zoom” forums for candidates in each of the Newport and Middletown Council and School Committee races, plus state elections for our local representatives.

Voters can now view the first of these forums featuring primary candidates for the Newport Council and State House of Representatives. Go to: newportalliance.org//2020-candidate-forum videos/

With a primary election for City Council just weeks away on September 8, it’s time we all get to better know the candidates, renew acquaintances with current office holders and take time to familiarize ourselves with the positions each candidate holds on critical issues affecting the future of Newport.

The Primary election on September 8 will choose eight At Large council candidates and two 3rd Ward candidates will run in the general election on November 3.

For information go to www.cityofnewport.com/en-us/city-hall/ departments/canvassing

As has been said, if we don’t vote, we not only ignore history but give away our future.

Alliance for a Livable Newport, Executive Board

Read More Here: https://www.newportthisweek.com/articles/get-to-know-the-candidates-2/

Ward 3 Candidates Square Off

Newport This Week  | on August 27, 2020By James Merolla

The fourth in a series of candidate forums took place on Aug. 20 for the three people vying for a Ward 3 seat on the Newport City Council.

The three candidates in the 40-minute forum included longtime incumbent Kathryn Leonard and challengers Paul Marshall and Rachel Hussey. Leonard, a veteran educator and realtor, had not been challenged in the previous three terms.

The two top vote getters in the Sept. 8 primary will appear on the November ballot.

The forum is a collaboration among The Alliance for a Livable Newport, East Bay TV, the Greater Newport Chamber of Commerce, the League of Women Voters Newport County, Newport Buzz, Newport This Week and WADK radio. The moderator was Christian Winthrop of Newport Buzz.

Marshall serves on the Planning Board and is principle at PM Consulting Services. Hussey is a teacher at St. Michael’s School.

Leonard said her top priorities for the next term are traffic, congestion and community cohesive- ness. Hussey pointed to schools, the economy and quality of life. Marshall cited equity, the environment and education.

None of the candidates supported a Homestead Exemption, were in favor of eliminating the ward election system or thought the Christopher Columbus statue on Bellevue Avenue should be removed. Marshall was the only candidate who would not support a study of a regionalized high school.

Each candidate spelled out why they are running.

“Ward 3 is large, it is diverse, and it is integral to our city,” said Hussey. “I am running for city council so that Ward 3’s creative solutions to age-old problems can be represented.”

Marshall said he is running “to ensure that Newport will grow in a conscientious, equitable and sustainable way.”

Leonard said, “I am an action person, known for doing things.”

To the question on development for the North End, and specifically, the proposal to redevelop the former Newport Grand property, Hussey said the plan set out by consultants was “on the right path,” possibly leading to affordable housing, as well as new small businesses and a lot of green space. She said she currently would support the proposal for Newport Grand, but wants more information.

Marshall said he hoped to steer citywide decisions “through an equity and inclusion lens,” and continue to get feedback from the community, so “we can fully understand the impact of our municipal decisions.”

Leonard said the most important aspect of the North End is “to have a more inclusive community that brings benefits to all residents.

“I’d like to see a good working trolley system, a transportation system, so people can get to work quickly,” she said. “Maybe have a healthcare clinic in the North End. I don’t want to see 90-foot high buildings.”

To the question of tighter ordinance restrictions on the development of waterfront property, based on the two new hotels getting approval, Marshall said the city has to ensure that people continue to have public access to the waterfront, and that this should be addressed with a climate resiliency effort to mitigate flooding and other problems.

Leonard cited zoning and the comprehensive land use plans. “If we don’t change the zoning ordinances first, we are in for big lawsuits,” she said.

She added that it is important for zoning to be addressed with a new look at height restrictions on buildings.

Many people in Ward 3 were not happy with heights, minimized access and other issues, Hussey said. “I would be open to looking at new ordinance restrictions,” she said.

As for climate change, all three noted the damage to Newport in heavy rainstorms. Leonard cited repairs Newport made over the years, including a $6 million repair of the misfiring pumping station. Hussey called it “a huge issue,” adding that trash and recycling had to be increased with the enhancement of communal gardens. Marshall said he addresses this in his profession and on the Planning Board. “We really need to invest in infrastructure and stormwater management and transportation,” he said, citing the Green and Complete Streets initiative.

As for exploring alternatives beyond property taxes to increase revenues, Hussey talked about building businesses in Newport and said too much money is going to the state. Marshall said he had some ideas about Clean Energy generating revenue here and reinvesting it on “micro grids.”

Leonard said the city could impose impact fees on big new developments, like hotels and apartment buildings, as many communities around the country already do. “I think Newport has become the ATM of the state,” she said. “We don’t get enough of the share of the tourism taxes.”

Read More Here: https://www.newportthisweek.com/articles/ward-3-candidates-square-off/

At Large Candidates Have Their Say

Newport This Week on August 27, 2020 By James Merolla

Two one-hour virtual forums took place on Aug. 19 and Aug. 20 among the 12 At Large candidates for Newport City Council. Jill Kassis, of the League of Women Voters and WADK’s Bruce Newbury served as moderators.

The forums are a collaboration among the Alliance for a Livable Newport, East Bay TV, the Greater Newport Chamber of Commerce, the League of Women Voters Newport County, Newport Buzz, Newport This Week and WADK radio.

On Aug. 19, the six candidates included incumbents Mayor Jamie Bova, Jeanne-Marie Napolitano and Justin McLaughlin, and challengers Meagan Landry, Derek Grinkin and Bill Kimes.

Grinkin owns and operates a property management business in Newport and is a football coach at Salve Regina University. Kimes is a special education teacher at Rogers High and a member of the School Building Committee. Landry has worked at Saccucci Honda in Middletown for eight years and previously worked at the Jane Pickens Theater.

On Aug.20, incumbents Lynn Ceglie and Susan Taylor were joined by challengers Beth Cullen, Olga Enger, Elizabeth Fuerte and Kevin Michaud.

Cullen is a past president of the Point Association and a longtime advocate for education reform. Enger owns Studio Newport and is also a longtime freelance writer. Fuerte serves on the Planning Board and is a community organizer for the Newport Health Equity Zone. Michaud has worked at T.F. Green Airport in the public safety department since 2004, and is an assistant manager of Easton’s Beach.

The candidates were first asked to describe their vision for the North End. Grinkin said he saw more opportunity, open space and industrial offerings, along with additional middle-income housing. McLaughlin, citing how complex the North End is with many different entities, said a “framework” has to be developed, with zoning in place, before the city can move forward.

Kimes said consultant work currently being done “excited” him with drawings denoting a potential waterway opening, green space, stormwater planning, a library and a basketball court. Landry said “open land is very important,” adding the Naval Hospital land should be turned into “some sort of park,” with more things for children to do.

Bova said the North End urban plan must be completed first with guidance from residents. “I want to make sure we are developing it with mixed use,” she said.

Napolitano, noting that Sheffield School had become Innovate Newport, lauded mixed-use with retail planning.

Fuerte said that she wants to see that area be “completely” part of the city, so that it is not cut off by the Newport Bridge.

Michaud called it an “eyesore,” and said, “anything would be an improvement up there.” He said if the planning process plays out, “We’ll be better off.”

Enger said the council “had to be very careful to keep the North End special.” Taylor said that she wanted it to be “a vibrant location for businesses,” and that better broadband was needed in the area.

Ceglie called affordable workforce housing a top priority, along with the introduction of new industry. Cullen advocated for “no more large hotels, with lots of trees.”

As to the proliferation of hotels while retaining city character, Kimes said, “You have to respond to what the community wants.”

Michaud said the city probably has to decide that “enough is enough.”

Landry said “neighborhood input was important,” while Bova said the comprehensive land-use plan’s conclusions must specifically be applied to zoning citywide, but not at the expense of neighborhoods.

Napolitano said the waterfront was “basically built out,” with little opportunity for more hotels that haven’t already been approved. She said future zoning for neighborhoods abutting the waterfront should have stricter guidelines. McLaughlin said the city has to work with the approved hotels “in order to get the best result in that zone.”

Enger said it was important to maintain “integrity,” but she did not support the ban on waterfront hotels. Taylor, said, “Newport needs a waterfront zone.”

Cullen said we had to have a value and a vision statement, which comes from strategic planning. “Newport hasn’t had a real authentic strategic plan in many, many years. We have to decide as a community what we want to be in the future,” she said.

Ceglie, calling the question difficult, said, “I don’t think people understand that the council is not the end all and be all on hotels. You need to strike a balance.”

Fuerte said she was in favor of possibly changing zoning ordinances.

Grinkin said, “Everything is going forward now and we hear the community’s voice and go in that direction.”

A question on climate change produced a variety of complex answers. Some cited improvements in water, sewer and runoff.

Kimes said future building should provide green space to deal with rising water levels. Mc- Laughlin said the sewer system investment dealt with three inches of rain in 45 minutes three weeks ago, but water runoff is a serious issue. Ceglie and Taylor cited rising sea levels. Taylor wanted the planning department to look at it. Ceglie said the city has put in measures, like shoring up the seawall.

“Education, education, education,” Cullen said. “We have to get our kids involved in the process.”

Fuerte suggested working with the Environmental Commission.

As for seeking alternatives beyond property taxes to enhance revenues, Bova suggested parking revenue as a partial solution. Landry said speeding ticket revenue might help.

Taylor said the city wanted to look at the hotel and food and beverage taxes, but Napolitano said they cannot be charged more than they are.

Ceglie said Newport should hire a government affairs candidate to represent the city at the Statehouse.

Cullen said that 3,500 people work at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center, but only 6 percent live in Newport. “We’re stuck in this tourism kind of mindset. There are so many things we can do,” she said.

Fuerte cited many “large” properties in Newport that do not pay taxes, and said the city should take a deeper look to see how “some revenue can be raised from that.”

Michaud said the council should look at fee structures and put more properties on the tax rolls.

In the “yes” and “no” lightning round, Kimes and Michaud were the only candidates who did not support a Homestead Exemption.

None of the 12 candidates favored discontinuing the ward system to make all candidates At Large.

Only Landry and Fuerte said they would not support a study of a regionalized high school in the future, regardless of the impending vote on a new Rogers High. All the candidates said their vision of the North End was conceived, at least in part, by the current proposal of that district by consultants.

None of the first six candidates supported moving the Christopher Columbus statue at Memorial Boulevard and Bellevue Avenue. The second group of six were not asked their opinion.


Read More Here: https://www.newportthisweek.com/articles/at-large-candidates-have-their-say/

Letter To The Editor: If we don’t vote, we not only ignore history but give away our future

What’s Up Newp | By Ryan Belmore -August 25, 2020

As it has since 2008, The Alliance for a Livable Newport is serving to provide Newport voters comprehensive information about the upcoming elections.

This year is no different – only more challenging, given that there are 19 candidates for the Newport City Council and 10 candidates for the Newport School Committee, undoubtedly reflective of the extraordinary issues now facing our city and schools. ALN applauds Incumbents running for reelection and the many new candidates who’ve taken the time and energy to throw their hats into the ring in a desire and commitment to serve our city.

The Alliance for a Livable Newport
The Alliance for a Livable Newport

To assist Newport voters, the Alliance for a Livable Newport asked challenging questions of the 12 At Large candidates and three 3rd Ward candidates vying for the Newport City Council Primary election. (The four candidates competing for the 1st and 2nd Ward seats in the General Election on November 3 have been asked the same questions.)

ALN is gratified that all 19 City Council candidates took the time to craft their responses which can now be found at NewportAlliance.org.

With a Primary election for City Council just weeks away on September 8, it’s time we all get to better know the candidates, renew acquaintances with current office holders and take time to familiarize ourselves with the positions each candidate holds on critical issues affecting the future of Newport.

The Primary election on September 8 will choose eight At Large council candidates and two 3rd Ward candidates will run in the General Election on November 3.

Each of these Council candidates has also been interviewed in depth by What’s Up Newport.

For complete information on voting go to https://www.cityofnewport.com/en-us/city-hall/departments/canvassing

As has been said, if we don’t vote, we not only ignore history but give away our future.

Thank you,

The Alliance for a Livable Newport Executive Board

Read more here: https://whatsupnewp.com/2020/08/letter-to-the-editor-if-we-dont-vote-we-not-only-ignore-history-but-give-away-our-future/

General Assembly Forum Enlightens Voters

Newport The Week | August 13, 2020 By James Merolla

The first in a series of one-hour virtual forums went off without a hitch on Aug. 6 for six local state general assembly candidates facing a primary election on Sept. 8.

The forum was a collaboration among The Alliance for a Livable Newport, East Bay TV, the Greater Newport Chamber of Commerce, the League of Women Voters Newport County, Newport Buzz, Newport This Week and WADK radio.

Watch the video here:

The candidates are incumbent Deborah Ruggiero, (D-74 Jamestown, Middletown), and her challenger, Henry “Rick” Lombardi; incumbent Terri Cortvriend, (D-72 Portsmouth, Middletown), and her challenger, Christopher Semonelli; and Michelle McGaw and John Edwards V for the D-71 open seat (Portsmouth, Little Compton, Tiverton). All six are Democrats.

Lynne Tungett, NTW owner and editor, served as host. The moderator was Joseph Pratt, executive director and CEO of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Newport County and chair of the Chamber’s Government Affairs Committee (GAC).

Questions were prepared by the League of Women Voters and GAC.

All the candidates favor expanded access to early voting. Edwards said that after the pandemic the state should reexamine the voter ID registration requirements.

Environmentally, all the candidates support renewable energy from alternative sources, and said that the state needs to do more as beaches erode and sea levels rise. Edwards and Semonelli raised the issue of cleaning up the former Naval Lodge site along Burma Road.

All support Gov. Gina Raimondo having line item veto power. McGaw, Edwards and Cortvriend said marijuana should be legalized, while on another yes/no question, Lombardi, Ruggiero, Cortvriend and Edwards said the state should eliminate the automobile tax.

Semonelli, Cortvriend, Edwards and McGaw said they would support legislation making “cocktails to go” a permanent law. Semonelli was the only candidate favoring the regionalization of school districts.

Cortvriend said she came into office in 2019 seeking more government transparency. “My priority has been being accessible to my constituents. It’s very important to be a liaison,” she said.

Semonelli said he will be fighting for funding for those “in need” and “educational excellence.

“I follow fiscal responsibility. I will not support cuts in education,” he said.

Lombardi said the state needs to find ways to create affordable housing for seniors and young families. “It is imperative to get new small businesses established in our state,” he said, while establishing “sustainable” funding for education.

Ruggiero said that COVID-19 has turned lives “upside down.

“Know [that] when the virus hits again, I will be there for everyone,” she said. “Experience matters.”

She said she has focused on the four “E’s” over past 10 years: economy, elderly, environment and education.

Edwards, detailing his business experience, said his top priority is the state’s nearly $1 billion deficit. He said he wants to “protect your hard-earned money [so] that we don’t spend what we don’t have.”

McGaw, a 30-year Portsmouth resident and pharmacist, with an expertise in healthcare, said she wants to help local families. “Our district needs a representative who really works for the people of our district,” she said.

Pratt’s first question was about deep budget cuts and additional tax revenue streams. Both Semonelli and Cortvriend said they would not touch programs that help the elderly and others in need.

Lombardi said, “[a] $200 million [state] deficit before COVID … someone has to explain why that continues to happen, year after year.”

He wondered how the state moves money from successful budget agencies. “DCYF in the red? We’ve got children dying in the care of DCYF,” he said.

“From a fiscal standpoint, I believe the state needs to be really strategic,” said Ruggiero. “COVID has shown us we have to invest in the internet, because we have to work remotely, distance learn and telehealth.”

Edwards said the state needs to concentrate on the successful financial things it has done and revisit them. He mentioned many organizations and businesses that have brought revenue to the state.

McGaw said there are certain things that cannot be cut. “People who need assistance with food … people who need assistance with housing.”

We must create a “more equitable tax structure,” she said.

Citing the tremendous loss to the local hospitality industry, an estimated 45 to 50 percent that will not come back, the candidates were asked what kind of renewal or resiliency plan they would implement.

Cortvriend said a key will be “to diversify and expand” the kinds of businesses that come to Aquidneck Island. Lombardi agreed, lamenting the closure of the Newport Visitor Center. Ruggiero, citing the $6.5 billion brought in annually to the state through tourism, including $900,000 to Aquidneck Island, wants the state to further promote tourism.

Semonelli, citing how small businesses are not happy with the speed with which the economy reopened, said, “We need to listen to them more to meet their needs.”

Five of the six candidates said they would not support expanding paid leave for companies with fewer than 17 employees or state and municipal employees. Only McGaw, citing restaurants who were hardest hit in the pandemic, said she would support it.

Susan Wells of the League of Women Voters, one of the forum sponsors, said the forum offered “a good civil exchange of views on a variety of important issues,” and provided “a valuable source of information for voters.”

There will be upcoming forums with the candidates for the Newport At Large and Ward 3 City Council seats on Aug. 19 and Aug. 20, respectively. The forums will be available for viewing on Aug. 21.

Read More Here: https://www.newportthisweek.com/articles/general-assembly-forum-enlightens-voters/

What’s Up Newp’s Voter Guide: Newport City Council

By Ryan Belmore -August 13, 2020

With less than three months to the General Election, and even less to the Primary Election, What’s Up Newp begins its comprehensive coverage of not only elections in Newport County, but also key statewide legislative races.

Surveys were emailed to candidates in Newport County. We have received several responses, with still more coming in. If you are a candidate and have not received a questionnaire, please contact What’s Up Newp or Frank Prosnitz at frank.prosnitz@gmail.com.

We asked about political, professional, and community background, about past accomplishments and issues the candidates hope to address during the next term.-

We will be running the candidates’ answers, grouping according to races. We begin today with the race for Newport City Council, both the At-Large seats and the three Ward seats.

This year’s Newport City Council race is among one of the most competitive races that we’ve seen in recent years.

Currently, there are twelve candidates running for the At-Large seats, with just four to be chosen.

In a primary on September 8th, voters in Newport will narrow down a dozen candidates to just eight for the At-Large seats. In the general election on November 3rd, the top four vote-getters will represent voters on the new council.

Because there are currently three candidates for Ward 3, voters in that district will narrow down three candidates to two candidates during the primary. Ward 1 and Ward 2 each have two candidates and will only face off during the General Election

Along with responding to the candidate survey, What’s Up Newp has invited all candidates running for Newport City Council to join us for a video interview where they will have the opportunity to answer and address a set of questions — about Covid-19, the school bond, tourism, affordability, and more.

Each candidate will be asked the same questions, all of which came from the What’s Up Newp crew and our readers.

As What’s Up Newp schedules these interviews and publishes survey results, we will embed or link to them here.

What’s Up Newp readers can watch the video interviews live as they happen if they wish below or on our Facebook Page, or watch them anytime after they are recorded.

Newport City Council At-Large

Check back often as we are scheduling interviews and publishing results as we receive responses from the candidates.

At-Large and Ward 3 Candidates listed in order of how they will appear on the primary ballot on September 8th.

Jamie Bova (Incumbent)

Justin McLaughlin (Incumbent)

Video interview scheduled for August 14th at 11 am.https://www.youtube.com/embed/hLTYWqzYUzw

Derek Grinkin

Elizabeth “Beth” Evans Cullen

Video interview scheduled for August 17th at 2 pmhttps://www.youtube.com/embed/tvcwf3T57bk

Lynn Ceglie (Ward 2 Incumbent)

Olga Enger

Jeanne-Marie Napolitano

Kevin Michaud

Video interview scheduled for August 18th at 2 pm

Meagan Landry

Elizabeth Fuerte

William Kimes

Video interview scheduled for 11 am on August 19th.https://www.youtube.com/embed/CfNA0sTqagw

Susan Taylor (Incumbent)

Newport City Council Ward 1

What’s Up Newp Survey Results for Ward 1

Angela McCalla (Incumbent)

Hugo DeAscentis

Newport City Council Ward 2

Charlie Holder

Kim Salerno

Newport City Council Ward 3

Katheryn Leonard (Incumbent)

Rachel Hussey

Paul Marshall


Read More Here: https://whatsupnewp.com/2020/08/whats-up-newps-voter-guide-newport-city-council/

Video – A State Primary Forum – General Assembly Candidates 08-06-20

By Newport This Week Staff | on August 07, 2020

Our first in a series of candidate forums for the 2020 election, this video features candidates for General Assembly in Newport County.

Candidates for the General Assembly who have primary races on Sept. 8:

  • John Edwards – District 71
  • Michelle McGaw – District 71
  • Terri-Denise Cortvriend – District 72
  • Christopher Semonelli – District 72
  • Henry “Rick” Lombardi – District 74
  • Deborah Ruggiero – District 74

Moderated by Joe Pratt, Executive Director of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Newport County, a Chamber Board Member and Chair of the Chamber’s Government Affairs Committee.

This presentation is brought to you by a collaboration between the Alliance for a Livable NewportEast Bay TVGreater Newport Chamber of CommerceLeague of Women VotersNewport BuzzNewport This Week and WADK. The purpose of the collaboration is to inform Newport County Voters. The positions held by any one of them do not represent the viewpoints or opinions of others in the group.

Read More Here: https://www.newportnow.online/articles/newport-this-week-presents-a-state-primary-forum-general-assembly-candidates-08-06-20/

Social Widgets powered by AB-WebLog.com.